Post Polio Syndrome (PPS)

Post-polio syndrome (“PPS”) affects people who have a history of polio infection. It can affect people decades after their original exposure to the polio virus. There was an epidemic of polio in the 1950’s. Most of the people affected were children at that time so those who are currently suffering from PPS are either past retirement age or closely approaching retirement age. You are not eligible for disability benefits once you have reached retirement age so we are not currently seeing a lot of PPS cases.

People who suffer from PPS can experience a wide range of symptoms including muscle weakness, joint degeneration and fatigue. Often PPS sufferers have trouble sleeping and breathing during sleep due to muscle weakness in the lungs. If you are fatigued and sleepy, it is very difficult to work. Muscle degeneration and weakness can also cause you difficulty with mobility.

If you are over 50 and limited to no more than sedentary work due to the symptoms of your PPS, you could be considered disabled. Sedentary work is defined as being able to stand or walk in combination no more than 2 hours total out of an 8 hour work day and being able to lift no more than 10 lbs. occasionally and nothing more than light thing such as paper or files frequently. If you are over 55 and limited to no more than light work due to the symptoms of your PPS, you could be considered disabled. Light work is defined as being able to stand or walk in combination no more than 6 hours total out of an 8 hour work day and lifting no more than 20 lbs. occasionally and no more than 10 lbs. frequently. If your PPS is causing you interruptions to concentration such that you cannot even complete simple tasks in a timely manner, then you could be considered disabled regardless of your age.