Hemangioma

A hemangioma is a kind of tumor created by a complex mass of blood vessel cells that become filled with blood. Hemangiomas can be congenital and occur more commonly in children. They typically occur on the skin and usually disappear over time. They occur more frequently in women than in men. This is true because, although the causes of hemangioma are unknown, their development is thought to be related to estrogen. Hemangiomas do not usually cause symptoms that cause significant limitations of function. However, the degree to which a hemangioma affects your functioning in daily life would depend on the body system it affects. In adults a hemangioma might occur in the liver and could cause problems with liver function that could affect multiple other body systems. In a case like that, your disability would be determined by the severity of the dysfunction of your liver and the resulting limitations your liver disease causes you in your daily life. Liver disease can typically result in fatigue, malaise, nausea and abdominal pain. If these symptoms would prevent you from attending work regularly or cause you to need to rest away from the work station more often than is usually allowed in the work place, then you could be considered disabled for those reasons. This is true for any other body system that your hemangioma affects.