Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Body dysmorphic disorder (“BDD”) is a mental health issue that fits under the category of somatoform disorder. People who suffer from BDD are obsessed with perceived shortcomings in their personal appearance. This often results in depression and anxiety. It is usually easier to meet the criteria for depression or anxiety than for somatoform disorders by themselves. The criteria for depression and anxiety are listing under Section 12.04 and Section 12.6 of the Social Security Administration’s listing of impairments. Somatoform disorders are covered under Section 12.07 of the Social Security Administration’s listing of impairments.

12.07 Somatoform disorders: Physical symptoms for which there are no demonstrable organic findings or known physiological mechanisms.

The required level of severity for these disorders is met when the requirements in both A and B are satisfied.

A. Medically documented by evidence of one of the following:

  1. A history of multiple physical symptoms of several years duration, beginning before age 30, that have caused the individual to take medicine frequently, see a physician often and alter life patterns significantly; or
  2. Persistent nonorganic disturbance of one of the following:
    1. Vision, or
    2. Speech; or
    3. Hearing; or
    4. Use of a limb; or
    5. Movement and its control (e.g., coordination disturbance, psychogenic seizures, akinesia, dyskinesia; or
    6. Sensation (e.g., diminished or heightened).
  3. Unrealistic interpretation of physical signs or sensations associated with the preoccupation orbelief that one has a serious disease or injury;

AND

B. Resulting in at least two of the following:

  1. Marked restriction of activities of daily living; or
  2. Marked difficulties in maintaining social functioning; or
  3. Marked difficulties in maintaining concentration, persistence, or pace; or
  4. Repeated episodes of decompensation, each of extended duration.